Difference between revisions of "DXSpider Filtering Manual"

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#[[Authors and Contributors]]
 
 
#[[Introduction]]
 
#[[Introduction]]
 
#[[Foreword]]
 
#[[Foreword]]

Revision as of 14:21, 18 December 2008

  1. Introduction
  2. Foreword
  3. Configuring spot filters
    1. What is a spot filter?
    2. How can filters be used?
  4. Types of spot filters used in DXSpider
    1. Numbering lines and slots
    2. Reject before accept
    3. Using multiple reject filter rules
    4. A very useful command
    5. Case does not matter
    6. Qualifiers
    7. Comma separation
  5. Reject filters
    1. Filters to reject spots based on frequency
    2. Bands Available
    3. Regions Available
    4. Examples
    5. Sub-bands as part of range
    6. Filters to reject spots based on the "info" data in the spot
    7. Filters to reject spots based on call
    8. Filters to reject spots based on call_dxcc
    9. Filters to reject spots based on call_itu
    10. Filters to reject spots based on call_zone
    11. Filters to reject spots based on call_state
    12. Filters to reject spots based on by
  6. Accept filters
    1. Filters to accept spots based on frequency
    2. Sub-bands as part of range
    3. Filters to accept spots based on info
    4. Filters to accept spots based on call
    5. Filters to accept spots based on call_dxcc
    6. Filters to accept spots based on call_itu
    7. Filters to accept spots based on call_zone
    8. Filters to accept spots based on call_state
    9. Filters to accept spots based on by
  7. Clear filters
  8. Some Practice Examples
  9. Contacts


 ______________________________________________________________________
 �[1m1.  Introduction.�[0m
 The PacketCluster software written in the mid-80s by Dick Newell,
 AK1A, has served us well.  Dick has moved on though and has not
 supported the software with updates etc. for the last 10 years.
 Numerous PacketCluster "clones" have come and gone over the years,
 however there is one, called DX Spider, which provides a very similar
 user interface to that of AK1A, allows internet connections of users
 and node-to-node links, is actively supported by the author, and best
 of all is freeware.  FRC has started to convert several nodes to
 Spider.


 One of the strengths of DX Spider is its very powerful and flexible DX
 spot filtering routines.  These filters are totally different from
 anything we learned how to do with PacketCluster, and along with their
 power and flexibility comes somewhat of a learning curve.  Hence the
 need for this primer.


 In the following sections, you will learn that you can filter DX spots
 by:


      Frequency of the spot
      Mode of the spot
      Callsign of the spot (by state, country, zone, or specific callsign)
      Callsign of the spotter (by state, country, zone, or specific callsign)
      Callsign of the source node of the spot (by state, country, zone, or specific callsign)


 With a few keystrokes, you can set up a filter for the CQ WW SSB
 contest, for example, that says that you only want to see SSB spots on
 the contesting bands.  In the ARRL contest, it is simple to exclude
 spots for Ws and VEs.  For example, the best all around one-line
 filter for users in the CQ WW SSB contest would be:


      accept/spots on contesthf/ssb


 This simply reads, "I want to get spots on the hf contesting bands on
 SSB only."


 Jim Samuels, W3BG, has put together this primer which not only
 provides complete details on the format for all the available filter
 commands, but also provides useful examples that can be simply typed
 in, without the need to learn the specifics.


 I would be remiss in not thanking Charlie Carroll, K1XX, who gave a
 lot of encouragement and mentoring, and provided some of the material
 in this primer.


 As always, your local sysop is available to help you out, if need be.
 Don't hesitate to contact him for assistance.


 73 - Dave N3RD


 �[1m2.  Foreword�[0m
 While attempting to learn how DXSpider filters work, I found that I
 had to glean bits and pieces of information from the DXSpider User
 Manual and Administrators Guide as well as various posted messages,
 help files and the program and data-base files themselves. Therefore,
 this is by no means an original work. I have used and in some cases
 copied from some of these sources. What I have tried to accomplish is
 to gather this scattered information, put it in one spot (please
 pardon the pun) so others might benefit. I would advise those with
 interest to go back and read these other sources at their leisure.


 �[1m3.  Configuring Spot Filters�[0m
 �[1m3.1.  What is a spot filter?�[0m
 A spot filter is one rule (a one line spot filter) or multiple rules
 (multiple line spot filters) that a user can setup within DXSpider to
 control which specific spot(s) are received at the shack console.
 These configurable filters/rules reside on the DXSpider node and are
 stored along with the user's other information. Filters can be likened
 to a car wash . . . . . like cars, information goes in one end dirty,
 gets washed and comes out the other end cleaned.


 All spots received from other users on the cluster, or those received
 from other nodes, start out life destined for each and every connected
 user's console. If spot filtering has been configured, all spots
 headed for that user first go into the filter input, are processed and
 sent out the other end of these filters before being sent to the
 user's console. Like a car wash, each spot goes through one or many
 stages depending on whether the user wanted a simple or a super-duper
 filtering job.  Along the way, the spot gets scrubbed, unwanted
 information removed or wanted information passed on and finally the
 wanted spots only are spit out the other end - nice and clean with all
 unwanted "stuff" sent down the drain to the infamous "bit-bucket."


 �[1m3.2.  How can filters be used?�[0m
 For example, let's say our local user has never owned a microphone in
 his life and definitely doesn't want to see any of those useless SSB
 spots. Our user simply sets up a basic filter to reject any SSB spots
 before they reach the user's console.  Similarly, it's now the ARRL CW
 DX contest weekend, so not only does our user not want to see SSB
 spots, but now doesn't want to see any UHF, VHF, DATA or any
 US/Canadian "DX" spots. Our user now only accepts HF CW CONTEST spots
 and in the same rule rejects spots for W and VE stations. In these and
 many more situations, "filters are our friends."


 �[1m4.  Types of spot filters used in DXSpider�[0m
 Basic filter types are "accept", "reject", and "clear" where the
 following applies ...


 Reject filters - any spots that match will be dumped, all others passed on.
 Accept filters - any spots that match are passed on, all others are dumped.
 Clear filters  - the filter slot(s) referenced will be cleared from the filter
                  repository


 For the most part we will use only reject and accept filters. These
 are the main filter types. Basically, reject means dump it and accept
 means take it and pass it on to the user. By nature, accept filters
 are more powerful than reject filters. A user can generally do with a
 one line accept rule what it could take many lines of reject rules to
 accomplish. However, the flip-side of this statement is that a series
 of reject filters are usually easier to administer and change.


 �[1m4.1.  Numbering lines and slots�[0m
 There are ten usable filter slots in DXSpider. Each slot holds one
 reject and one accept rule. Therefore, each type filter can have up to
 ten lines of rules contained in these ten slots. The filter rules must
 be numbered sequentially, that is, 0-9 lines of reject filter rules
 and 0-9 lines of accept filter rules to correspond to their respective
 slot position. If no number is used, every line is assumed to be in
 slot 1 and the addition of a second filter line of the same type
 without a number will just over-write the first that was previously
 written to slot 1. (Why not slot 0? I don't know. This is the way it
 works.)


 �[4mImportant:�[24m The filter rules are applied in sequence, i.e., 0-9. If a
 line matches, action is taken on that line. The filter sequence acts
 on rules in the order listed.  It acts on the reject filter in each
 slot before acting on the accept filter contained in that slot. If the
 slot is completely blank or if a reject or accept filter line is
 missing in that slot it skips right over to the next filter rule in
 the sequence. A picture of a filter set might look like this ...


      Execution Sequence      Slot Number     Filter Rule
              1                 Slot0         reject/spot 0 <pattern>
              2                               accept/spot 0 <pattern>
              3                 Slot1         reject/spot 1 <pattern>
              4                               accept/spot 1 <pattern>
              5                 Slot2         reject/spot 2 <pattern>
              6                               accept/spot 2 <pattern>
              .                       .
              19                Slot9         reject/spot 9 <pattern>
              20                              accept/spot 9 <pattern>


 �[1m4.2.  Reject before accept�[0m
 This is not a good rule for life, but it makes sense for DXSpider
 filters. As a general rule, reject filter rules within a slot are
 always executed before accept filter rules.  There is a very good
 reason for this.  If a spot doesn't match a reject filter, the spot is
 passed to the next filter line in the set.  However, if a spot matches
 an accept filter, it is sent immediately to the user.
 �[1m4.3.  Using Multiple Reject Filter Rules�[0m
 Another important concept to know is that you can do everything you
 want to do with multiple reject filters AND NO ACCEPT FILTERS.  By
 default, if a spot doesn't match any of the reject filter definitions,
 then the system considers you want the spot and sends it to you.  For
 example, the following two filters perform exactly the same thing ...


      accept/spots on contesthf
      reject/spots not on contesthf


 So, why would we choose one rather than the other?  Using reject
 syntax allows you to add another filter line easily, without
 disturbing the first line.  A real example will show us how this
 works.  Let's say that there is a RTTY contest coming up and you don't
 wish to see the RTTY spots.  Simply add another reject filter like
 this ...


      reject/spots 2 on hf/rtty


 Note that we need to specify that this is the second line of reject
 filter definitions.  Also, the "RTTY" sub-band specification has to be
 associated with a range of bands; it can't be specified all by itself.
 So, we just add it behind the range of bands defined by "HF".  So in
 our example, if the user does a show/filter, he will be told by the
 Spider that his current filters are ...


      filter 1 reject not on contesthf
      filter 2 reject on hf/rtty


 With these filters set up, if a spot comes through on 14085 kHz, the
 filter works like this ...


      filter1:    Is spot NOT on the HF contest bands?  No.
                  The spot doesn't match the filter definition, so pass it to
                  next filter.
      filter2:    Is spot within the frequency range defined for RTTY?  Yes.
                  Since the spot matches the filter definition, the spot is rejected
                  and the user never sees it.


 Had the frequency of the spot been 14025, then the spot would have not
 matched the filter2 definition either, would have passed through all
 the filters, and would have been sent to the user at the end of the
 filter set.  Similarly, had the spot been on 10 MHz, it would have met
 the definition of filter1, been rejected immediately, and the
 filtering process would have stopped before processing filter2.


 In addition, the filtering system has a rough time handling accept
 filters followed by reject filters and adds inefficiency to the
 processing.  (Note: a reject as a "qualifier" to an accept rule in an
 accept filter line is okay as we will see below)


 �[1m4.4.  A very useful command�[0m
 To see all active filters in use at any time, just type the following
 command ...


      show/filter


 �[1m4.5.  Case does not matter�[0m
 In entering any filter - case does not matter. Upper, lower, or mixed
 case will not effect how filters work or perform.


 �[1m4.6.  Qualifiers�[0m
 Logical operands can be used in rule sets to combine multiple actions
 or qualify others. These are ...


      and     a and b= action
      not     a not b= action
      or      a and not (c or b)= action


 Note: as a general rule when or is used you must also use parentheses
 ().  We will see how these can be used in examples later.


 �[1m4.7.  Comma Separation�[0m
 Any command can have multiple pattern variables if commas separate
 them.  For example ...


      reject/spot call_state nj,ny,pa,de,md


 �[1m5.  Reject filters�[0m
 A reject filter line means that if a spot matches, send it to the
 trash, dump it, do not send it down the line to the next rule or to
 the user, but pass-on all other spots that do not match.
      Syntax: reject/spots [0-9]  <pattern>


 Any of the following patterns may be used in this line ...


      freq <range>
      on <range>
      info <string>
      call <prefixes>
      call_dxcc <numbers>
      call_itu <numbers>
      call_zone <numbers>
      call_state <state 2-letter abbreviations>
      by <prefixes>
      by_dxcc <numbers>
      by_itu <numbers>
      by_zone <numbers>
      by_state <state 2-letter abbreviations>
      origin <prefixes> Used primarily be SYSOPS,  not by users and not discussed.
      channel <prefixes> Used primarily be SYSOPS,  not by users and not discussed.


 �[1m6.  Filters to reject spots based on frequency�[0m


      Syntax: reject/spot [0-9] freq <range>
      or
      reject/spot [0-9] on <range>


 Important: both �[4mfreq�[24m and �[4mon�[24m are exactly the same and can be used
 interchangeably - most persons use �[4mon�[24m (less typing.)


 For range, you can specify a frequency like 7040, a range of
 frequencies like 0/30000 ( the whole HF band) or use any of the "band"
 or "region" names defined in the show/bands command.


 �[1m6.1.  Bands Available�[0m


 73kHz:          71 -> 75
 136kHz:         135 -> 138
 160m:           1800 -> 2000
 80m:            3500 -> 4000
 60m:            5258 -> 5407
 40m:            7000 -> 7400
 30m:            10100 -> 10150
 20m:            14000 -> 14350
 17m:            18068 -> 18168
 15m:            21000 -> 21450
 12m:            24890 -> 24990
 10m:            28000 -> 29700
 military:       29700 -> 50000, 230000 -> 420000
 band1:          47000 -> 49999, 52000 -> 68000
 6m:             50000 -> 52000
 pmrlow:         68000 -> 87500
 4m:             70000 -> 70500
 band2:          87500 -> 108000
 aircraft:       108000 -> 137500
 pmrmid:         138000 -> 165000
 2m:             144000 -> 148000
 pmrhigh:        165000 => 174000
 band3:          176000 => 230000
 220:            220000 => 222000
 pmruhf:         425000 => 430000, 440000 => 471000
 70cm:           430000 => 450000
 band4:          471000 => 550000
 band5:          550000 => 868000
 23cm:           1240000 => 1325000
 13cm:           2310000 => 2450000
 9cm:            3400000 => 3475000
 6cm:            5650000 => 5850000
 3cm:            10000000 => 10500000
 12mm:           24000000 => 24250000
 6mm:            47000000 => 47200000


 �[1m6.2.  Regions Available�[0m


      all:            73khz 136khz 160m 80m 60m 40m 30m 20m 17m 15m 12m 10m 6m 4m
                      2m 220 70cm 23cm 9cm 6cm 3cm 12mm 6mm
      vhfradio:       band1 band2
      vhf:            6m 4m 2m 220
      contesthf:      160m 80m 40m 20m 15m 10m
      warc:           60m 30m 17m 12m
      pmr:            pmrlow pmrmid pmrhigh pmruhf
      spe:            10m 6m 4m 2m
      shf:            23cm 13cm 9cm 6cm 3cm
      vlf:            73khz 136khz
      uhftv:          band4 band5
      hf:             160m 80m 60m 40m 30m 20m 17m 15m 12m 10m
      vhftv:          band1 band3
      uhf:            70cm 23cm


 �[1m6.3.  Examples�[0m
 The following line will reject spots on 7,040 kHz and pass all others.


      reject/spot 0 freq 7040


 The next line will reject spots from 0 to 30,000 kHz and pass on all
 others.


      reject/spot 1 on 0/30000


 This next will trash all spots in the frequency range 144000 -> 148000
 kHz and pass on all others.


      reject/spot 2 freq 2m


 This rule will reject all spots on 6m, 4m, 2m, and 220  and pass on
 all others.


      reject/spot 3 on vhf


 This rule will dump all spots on the 160m, 80m, 60m, 40m, 30m, 20m,
 17m, 15m, 12m, 10m bands and all spots on 70cm and  23cm bands passing
 all other spots.


      reject/spot 4 freq hf and freq uhf


 This is a special spot to be used only by members of the Yankee
 Clipper Contest Club during contest weekends. Hi!


      reject/spot on all


 �[1m6.4.  Sub-bands as part of range�[0m
 In conjunction with range, you can use the following sub-band names,


      cw, rtty, data, ssb, and sstv


 by using a forward-slash [(band or region)/sub-band] as part of the
 range definition.  For example ...


 This rule will reject all HF phone spots passing on all others


      reject/spot 0 freq hf/ssb


 This filter rule will reject all HF CW spots but will not reject DATA
 and RTTY spots in the CW range and will pass on all other spots.


      reject/spot 1 on hf/cw and not (on hf/data or on hf/rtty)


 �[1m6.5.  Filters to reject spots based on the "info" data in the spot�[0m


      Syntax: reject/spot [0-9] info <string>


 This filter is used to key on information contained in the information
 section of the spot. One could use this to reject any spots containing
 IOTA, QSL OP or any other "key-word" used in the information string of
 the spot.


 Examples ...


 This filter will reject spots containing IOTA information and pass on
 all others


      reject/spot 0 info IOTA


 This filter will reject all general CW spots on HF, but will still
 permit any HF CW spots that contain iota information in addition to
 passing all others.


      reject/spot 1 on hf/cw and not info iota


 This next filter will reject spots asking or containing QSL
 information and pass on all others


      reject/spot 2 info QSL


 Note: The following series of filters are based on �[4mcall�[24m and �[4mby�[24m.  Call
 always references the callsign of the spotted DX station.  By always
 references the callsign of the spotting station.


 �[1m6.6.  Filters to reject spots based on call�[0m


      Syntax: reject/spot [0-9] call <prefixes>


 This filter is misleading in a way. It is strictly based on the
 spotted call sign letters or numbers entered and not based on
 countries or DXCC entities.  One could filter on JIMSAM62 if desired.


 Examples ...


 This filter will reject spots for G1AAA, GJ2BBB, and GW3CCC and will
 pass on spots for M0AAA.


      reject/spot 0 call G


 This next filter will reject spots for PA3AAA and pass on spots for
 PB4BBB


      reject/spot 1 call PA


 This filter will reject spots for K1AA, KC4AAA,  and KH6DDD and pass
 on spots for W3BG and N3RD


 reject/spot 2 call K


 �[1m6.7.  Filters to reject spots based on call_dxcc�[0m


      Syntax:  reject/spot [0-9] call_dxcc <numbers or prefixes>


 This filter is based on DXCC entities and uses either the country
 prefix or the DXCC entity number, found by using the command
 �[4mshow/prefix�[24m.


 As in ...


      show/prefix w
      W DXCC: 226 ITU: 7 CQ: 4 LL: 43 0 N 87 54 W (W, United-States-W)


      show/prefix VE
      VE DXCC: 197 ITU: 9 CQ: 5 LL: 45 18 N 66 6 W (VE, New-Brunswick-VE)
      DXCC: 197 ITU: 9 CQ: 5 LL: 48 30 N 56 0 W (VE, Newfoundland-VE)
      DXCC: 197 ITU: 9 CQ: 5 LL: 44 36 N 63 36 W (VE, Nova-Scotia-VE)
      DXCC: 197 ITU: 4 CQ: 5 LL: 45 30 N 73 36 W (VE, Quebec-VE)
      DXCC: 197 ITU: 4 CQ: 4 LL: 43 42 N 79 24 W (VE, Ontario-VE)
      DXCC: 197 ITU: 3 CQ: 4 LL: 49 54 N 97 6 W (VE, Manitoba-VE)
      DXCC: 197 ITU: 3 CQ: 4 LL: 50 30 N 104 36 W (VE, Saskatchewan-VE)
      DXCC: 197 ITU: 2 CQ: 3 LL: 51 0 N 114 6 W (VE, Alberta-VE)
      DXCC: 197 ITU: 2 CQ: 3 LL: 49 18 N 123 6 W (VE, British-Columbia-VE)
      DXCC: 197 ITU: 75 CQ: 1 LL: 60 42 N 135 6 W (VE, Yukon-VE)


 Example ...


 This spot filter will  reject all spots for US and Canada stations and
 pass on all others.


      reject/spot 0 call_dxcc 226,197


 This spot filter will  reject all spots for US and Canada stations and
 pass on all others including the special event station, W2WTC, who I
 want to work the next time he is on the air.


 reject/spot 1 call_dxcc w,ve not call w2wtc


 �[1m6.8.  Filters to reject spots based on call_itu�[0m
 Similarly, call_itu and call_zone use ITU regions that can also be
 obtained using the show/prefix <prefix> command (see above.)


      Syntax:  accept/spot [0-9] call_itu <numbers>


 Example ...


 This spot filter will reject all spots for ITU region 7 and pass on
 all others.


      reject/spot 0  call_itu 7


 �[1m6.9.  Filters to reject spots based on call_zone�[0m


      Syntax:  reject/spot [0-9] call_zone <numbers>


 This filter is based on CQ zones and uses the CQ zone number found by
 using the command �[4mshow/prefix�[24m (see above.)


 Example ...


 This spot filter will  reject all spots for CQ zone 5 and pass on all
 others.


      reject/spot 0 call_zone 5


 �[1m6.10.  Filters to reject spots based on call_state�[0m


      Syntax:  reject/spot [0-9] call_state <state2-letter abbreviations>


 This filter is based on the state of the call spotted, for those
 callsigns contained in the usdb database.  Use the command �[4mshow/usdb�[0m
 to see an example of a listing in the database, like this ...


      show/usdb k3ww
      K3WW    -> Perkasie, PA


 Example ...


 This spot filter will  reject all spots for stations in the Mid-
 Atlantic states and pass on all others.


      reject/spot call_state nj,ny,pa,de,md


 �[1m6.11.  Filters to reject spots based on by�[0m
 �[4mby�[24m filters are similar to and function exactly as call filters except
 that they act on the spotting station callsign and not the spotted
 callsign.


 So ...


 This filter is similar to and functions like the call <prefixes> (See
 above) except that it rejects spots generated by the spotting callsign
 and passes all other spots.


      Syntax:  reject/spot [0-9] by <prefixes>


 This next filter is based on DXCC entities and uses the DXCC entity
 number found by using the command  show/prefix <prefix> and it rejects
 spots generated within the spotting DXCC entity and passes all other
 spots.


      Syntax:  reject/spot [0-9] by_dxcc <numbers>


 This next filter is based on ITU regions and uses the ITU region
 number found by using the command �[4mshow/prefix�[24m (see above), except that
 it rejects spots generated by a spotting callsign within the ITU
 region and passes all other spots.


 Syntax:  reject/spot [0-9] by_itu <numbers>


 This filter is based on CQ zones and uses the CQ zone number found by
 using the command �[4mshow/prefix�[24m (see above), except that it rejects
 spots generated by a spotting callsign within the CQ zone and passes
 all other spots.


      Syntax:  reject/spot [0-9] by_zone <numbers>


 This filter is based on the state of the spotting station found by
 using the command �[4mshow/usdb�[24m and passes all other spots.


      Syntax:  reject/spot [0-9] by_state <state2-letter postal codes


 �[1m7.  Accept filters�[0m
 An accept filter line means that if a spot matches pass it on to the
 user, send it down the line to the next rule or to the user, and
 trash, dump, all other spots that do not match to the next filter
 line.


      Syntax: accept/spots [0-9]  <pattern>


 Any of the following patterns may be used in this line ...


      freq <range>
      on <range>
      info <string>
      call <prefixes>
      call_dxcc <numbers>
      call_itu <numbers>
      call_zone <numbers>
      call_state <state2-letter abbreviations>
      by <prefixes>
      by_dxcc <numbers>
      by_itu <numbers>
      by_zone <numbers>
      by_state <state2-letter abbreviations>
      origin <prefixes>   Used primarily be SYSOPS,  not by users and not discussed.
      channel <prefixes> Used primarily be SYSOPS,  not by users and not discussed.


 Using these patterns, we can accept spots based upon ...


      Frequency of the spot
      Callsign of the spot (country or zone)
      Callsign of the spotter (country or zone)
      Contents of the "information field" which comes with the spot


 �[1m7.1.  Filters to accept spots based on frequency�[0m


      Syntax: accept/spot [0-9] freq <range>
      or
      accept/spot [0-9] on <range>


 Important: as noted before, both �[4mfreq�[24m and �[4mon�[24m are exactly the same and
 can be used interchangeably.


 For range, you can specify a frequency like 7040, a range of
 frequencies like 0/30000 ( the whole HF spectrum) or use any of the
 band/region names defined in the SHOW/BANDS command (see above).


 Examples...


 This will pass on a HF spots only from 0 to 30,000 kHz and dump all
 others.


      accept/spot 1 on 0/30000


 This passes on all spots in the frequency range 144000 -> 148000 kHz
 and trash all others.


      accept/spot 2 freq 2m


 This rule will only pass on spots on 6m, 4m, 2m, and 220 and reject
 all others.


      accept/spot 3 on vhf


 This rule will pass on all spots on the 160m, 80m, 60m, 40m, 30m, 20m,
 17m, 15m, 12m, 10m bands and all spots on 70cm and 23cm bands only.
 All other spots are trashed.


      accept/spot 4 freq hf and freq uhf


 �[1m7.2.  Sub-bands as part of range�[0m
 In conjunction with range, you can use the following sub-band names:
 CW, RTTY, DATA, SSB, and SSTV by using a back-slash [(band or
 region)/sub-band] as part of the range definition.


 Examples ...


 This rule will only accept and pass on HF phone spots rejecting all
 others


      accept/spot 0 freq hf/ssb


 This filter rule will accept all HF CW spots but will not include DATA
 and RTTY spots in the CW range. In addition all other spots will be
 dumped.


      accept/spot 1 on hf/cw and not (on hf/data or on hf/rtty)


 �[1m7.3.  Filters to accept spots based on info�[0m


      Syntax: accept/spot [0-9] info <string>


 This filter is used to key on information contained in the information
 section of the spot. One could use this to accept any spots containing
 IOTA, QSL OP or any other "key-word" used in the information string of
 the spot.


 Examples ...


 This filter will accept spots containing IOTA information only and
 reject all others
      accept/spot 0 info IOTA


 This filter will accept only 10m SSB spots, but will still permit any
 spots that contain iota information in addition - rejecting all other
 spots.


      accept/spot 1 on 10m/ssb and info iota


 This next filter will accept spots asking or containing QSL
 information and dump all other spots


      accept/spot 2 info QSL


 Note: The following series of filters are based on �[4mcall�[24m and �[4mby�[24m.  Call
 always references the callsign of the spotted DX station.  By always
 references the callsign of the spotting station.


 �[1m7.4.  Filters to accept spots based on call�[0m


      Syntax: accept/spot [0-9] call <prefixes>


 This filter is misleading in a way. It is strictly based on the
 spotted call sign letters or numbers entered and not based on
 countries or DXCC entities.


 Examples ...


 This filter will accept spots for G1AAA, GJ2BBB, and GW3CCC and reject
 all others, including M0AAA.


      accept/spot 0 call G


 This next filter will accept spots for PA3AAA and reject spots for
 PB4BBB as well as all others.


      accept/spot 1 call PA


 This filter will accept spots for callsigns beginning with "K", i.e.,
 K1AA, KC4AAA,  KH6DDD and reject spots for W3BG and N3RD as well as
 all other spots.


      accept/spot 2 call K


 �[1m7.5.  Filters to accept spots based on call_dxcc�[0m


      Syntax:  accept/spot [0-9] call_dxcc <numbers or prefixes>


 This filter is based on DXCC entities and uses either the country
 prefixes or the DXCC entity number found by using the command
 �[4mshow/prefix�[24m. See example of �[4mshow/prefix�[24m above.


 Examples ...


      accept/spot 0 call_dxcc 226,197
      or
      accept/spot 0 call_dxcc ve,w


 (Both will work) These spot filters will accept all spots for US and
 Canada stations and trash all others.


 The folowing spot filter will accept all spots for US stations and yet
 reject any spots for W3FM who is always being spotted by Europeans and
 filling up my screen.


      accept/spot 1 call_dxcc w not call w3fm


 �[1m7.6.  Filters to accept spots based on call_itu�[0m
 Similarly, call_itu and call_zone use ITU regions that can also be
 obtained using the �[4mshow/prefix�[24m command (see above.)


      Syntax:  accept/spot [0-9] call_itu <numbers>


 Example ...


 This spot filter will  accept all spots for  ITU region 7 and reject
 all others.


      accept/spot 0  call_itu 7


 �[1m7.7.  Filters to accept spots based on call_zone�[0m


      Syntax:  accept/spot [0-9] call_zone <numbers>


 This filter is based on CQ zones and uses the CQ zone number found by
 using the command �[4mshow/prefix�[24m (see above.)


 Example ...


 This spot filter will  accept all spots for CQ zone 5 and reject all
 others.


      accept/spot 0 call_zone 5


 �[1m7.8.  Filters to accept spots based on call_state�[0m


      Syntax:  accept/spot [0-9] call_state <state2-letter postal codes>


 This filter is based on state of the call spotted for those callsigns
 contained in the usdb database.


 Example ...


 This spot filter will  accept all spots of stations located in the
 Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and reject all others. It's the PA QSO
 Party Weekend.


      accept/spot 0  call_state pa


 �[1m7.9.  Filters to accept spots based on by�[0m
 �[4mby�[24m filters are similar to and function exactly as call filters except
 that they act on the spotting station callsign and not the spotted
 callsign


 So ...


 This filter is similar to and functions like the  call <prefixes> (See
 above) except that it accepts spots generated by the spotting callsign
 and dumps all other spots.


      Syntax: accept/spot [0-9] by <prefixes>


 This filter is based on DXCC entities and uses the DXCC entity number
 found by using the command �[4mshow/prefix�[24m and it accepts spots generated
 within the spotting DXCC entity and rejects other spots.


      Syntax:  accept/spot [0-9] by_dxcc <numbers>


 This next filter is based on ITU regions and uses the ITU region
 number found by using the command �[4mshow/prefix�[24m (see above), except that
 it accepts spots generated by a spotting callsign within the ITU
 region and rejects all other spots.


      Syntax:  accept/spot [0-9] call_itu <numbers>


 This filter is based on CQ zones and uses the CQ zone number found by
 using the command �[4mshow/prefix�[24m (see above), except that it accepts
 spots generated by a spotting callsign within the CQ zone and rejects
 all other spots.


      Syntax:  accept/spot [0-9] call_zone <numbers>


 This filters is based on the state location of the spotting station
 found by using the command �[4mshow/usdb�[24m and accepts only those spots
 generated by stations from the states(s) specified rejecting all other
 spots.


      Syntax:  accept/spot [0-9] by_state <state2-letter postal codes>


 �[1m8.  Clear filters�[0m
 A clear filter line will delete the slot number specified or all slots
 and consequently all filters that have been created by a user.


      Syntax: clear/spots [0-9]
      or
      clear/spots all


 Example ...


 This will clear any or both accept and reject spot filters in slot 2.


      clear/spots 2


 This will clear each and every user spot filter  - it will clear out
 all filters in all slots.


      clear/spots all


 Note - if you just want to replace a spot filter, enter the rule again
 (with a line number) and it will overwrite the previous filter in that
 slot. If you forget the line number, it will overwrite the filter in
 slot 1 by default.


 �[1m9.  Some Practice Examples�[0m
 The proceeding sections have discussed the basics of DXSpider filters.
 The following are some examples utilizing basic filters and some not
 so basic combination filters.


 Let's say you don't want to see any of those 6m, 2m, or 220 spots.


      reject/spot 0 on uhf


 As a good stand alone contest filter ...


 accept/spot on contesthf/<mode> where mode is either CW, SSB, or RTTY


 Note: since a slot number is not included slot 1 is assumed.


 It's a CW contest weekend so you don't want to see any WARC band or
 SSB spots.


      accept/spots 0 on contesthf/cw


 It's the same weekend, but you also don't want to see any US or
 Canadian spots, or any rtty and data spots that are included in the CW
 portion of the bands.  Any of the following will accomplish the same
 result:


      reject/spot 0  not on contesthf/cw
      reject/spot 1 on contesthf/data
      reject/spot 2 call_dxcc w,ve
      or
      accept/spot 0 on contesthf/cw and not (call_dxcc 226,197 or on contesthf/data)
      or
      accept/spot 0 on contesthf/cw and not (call_dxcc w,ve or on contesthf/data)


 The following two discussions are from the Administrator Manual and
 are good "textbook" examples:


      rej/spot on hf/cw
      acc/spot on 0/30000
      acc/spot 2 on 50000/1400000 and (by_zone 14,15,16 or call_zone 14,15,16)


 Note that accept and reject can be abbreviated. Also, the first filter
 has not been specified with a number. This will automatically be
 assumed to be number 1.  In this case, we have said to reject all HF
 spots in the CW section of the bands but accept all others at HF. Also
 accept anything in VHF and above that is spotted in or by operators in
 the zones 14, 15 and 16. Each filter slot actually has a 'reject' rule
 slot and an 'accept' rule slot. The reject rule slot is executed
 BEFORE the accept rule slot.


 It was mentioned earlier that after a reject test that doesn't match,
 the default for following tests is 'accept', the reverse is true for
 'accept'. In the example what happens is that the reject is executed
 first, any non hf/cw spot is passed to the accept line, which lets
 through everything else on HF.  The next filter line lets through just
 VHF/UHF spots from EU.


 If you set a reject filter like this ...


      reject/spots on hf/cw


 Then you will get everything except HF CW spots. You could make this
 single filter even more flexible. For example, if you are interested
 in IOTA and will work it on CW even though normally you are not
 interested in CW, then you could say ...


      reject/spots on hf/cw and not info iota


 But in that case you might only be interested in iota and say,


      accept/spots not on hf/cw or info iota


 which achieves exactly the same thing.  Note that since slot numbers
 were not used, slot 1 is assumed.


 �[1m10.  Contacts�[0m
 This Primer is a work in progress. Additional features and filters are
 added from time to time by Dirk Koopman, G1TLH, the developer behind
 DXSpider. So periodic revisions will be made to this document. If you
 have any questions, comments, or suggestions relative to this primer
 on spot filtering, please contact,


      Jim Samuels, W3BG jimsam@comcast.net
      or
      Dave Hawes, N3RD (W3FRC Cluster SYSOP) dave.n3rd@comcast.net